National Science Day is celebrated in India on 28 February each year to mark the discovery of the Raman effect by Indian physicist Sir C. V. Raman on 28 February 1928. For his discovery, Sir C.V. Raman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930.

In 1986, the Government of India, under then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, designated February 28 as National Science Day to commemorate the announcement of the discovery of the “Raman Effect”.

This year’s edition is being celebrated under the theme of “Global Science for Global Wellbeing”, in light of India’s G20 presidency.

Raman was born to a family of Sanskrit scholars in Trichy (present-day Tiruchirapalli) in the Madras Presidency in 1888. At the age of only 16, He received a BA degree from Presidency College in Madras, and was placed first in his class.

From 1907 to 1933, he worked in Kolkata at the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, doing research on various topics in Physics.

On February 28, 1928, Raman led an experiment with Indian physicist KS Krishnan, on the scattering of light, when he discovered what now is called the Raman effect.

By 1921, CV Raman had gained a solid reputation as a top scientific mind both in India and in the West. That year, he made his first journey to England. It was on the return journey that Raman would make an observation that would change his life and science forever.

The main objective of National Science Day is to bring awareness to people about the importance of science in our daily life and to encourage people by popularizing Science and Technology.